Moving For Job

Moving for Job
Moving for Job

Moving for job whether you’ve been offered a job in another city or you’re simply looking to expand your search, moving for a job is a huge decision. One that many people are faced with every day. According to one Consumer Study, which surveyed 8,000 consumers, including 6,300 who had either moved homes within the last 12 months or are planning to move within the next 12 months, a new job or transfer is consistently among the top five reasons that people move. About half of them relocated to another state or out of the country.

Moving house and moving for a job is probably high on most people’s lists.
Trying to do both at the same time can be even more stressful. You have to adjust to a new role and performance standards, build a relationship with a new boss and acclimate to a new company culture. Having a husband, wife, life partner or kids adds even more complexity to the relocation process. Are they on board with the move? Uprooting your kids to have them adjust to their new schools and neighborhood is not an easy decision either. You’re not just transitioning to a new job, you’re transitioning to a new life. Relocating for a job can be fun but is also a challenge. How do you handle best the move?

Research. Research. Research

When your prospective new job requires you to uproot your life, you must be prepared in more ways than one. The more you know about the job, company, the new city and prospective schools for your kids, the more educated your decision and the less stressful the transition will be on everyone. A general rule of thumb is that you should earn 10% to 20% more than your current salary when changing jobs in the same city, but when you’re relocating, you can generally be a little more aggressive.

Hire trustworthy, professional movers

Be sure to use a reputable, licensed and insured moving company. Not all movers are the same and you want to make sure you do your homework and hire the right movers. You will be entrusting these people with precious cargo, so shop around and make sure you understand the process.

New employers may pay for the move

When moving for a specific employer, it is always a good idea to check with your benefits coordinator regarding relocation services. Many large employers have relationships with relocation companies that offer great financial benefits, such as covering moving expenses and closing costs fees, such as packing services, boxes or large-item fees, as well as storage fees if the truck needs to sit for a day while you wait to close on a property.